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for the next hour. this is the u.s. navy ship built in newport news, virginia, in 1969. the uss mount whitney is a big command and control ship which essentially means it can oversee really complex operations that the military is involved in. it was deployed to haiti, for example, in 1994 as the united states played a roll in ousting the military hunta that had taken over that country. remember when john mccain said today we are all georgians, when russia and the nation of georgia were having a war, and john mccain wanted us to start fighting russia alongside the georgians? it was the uss whitney deployed to bring humanitarian aid. it was the first ship to reach that georgia n part it went to. that's considered to be the most advanced command and control ship that the united states has ever floated. it is where the u.s. has been running the libyan war out of. between the admiral and a u.s. army general, this is where they've been running the war in libya from. as of last night, the uss mount whitney we think is not going to be the headquarters for the libyan war. that war effort will now be r
announcements about u.s. wars, about u.s. military interventions. some of them amounting to small wars, some amounting to very large wars. now that the united states has embarked on its latest new military intervention in libya, i would love to be able to show you the current president's oval office address on the subject, but there isn't one. president obama did make a public statement saturday afternoon that we had started that military intervention in libya, but did so from the confines of a convention center in brazil. eight years to the day that george w. bush stared unsteadily into the camera and announced the iraq invasion, president obama announced his own military intervention, but pointedly declined the opportunity to do it in a way that u.s. presidents usually do. president obama taking all sorts of criticism from the right over the past few days for not cancelling his trade visit to latin america as a result of this military action in libya. and the white house knew that criticism would come. their decision to go ahead with the trip anyway, to forego the chest thumping commander
senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people des
along the country's northeastern coast. american military officials confirm that more u.s. service members were exposed to radiation today and treated with iodine. but because of the wind direction, several navy ships moved closer to the coast after initial pullback of radiation concerns two major aftershocks rattled japan today, causing buildings to sway in tokyo. food, water and heat shortages continue. correspondent adam housley has the latest. >> they is survived the fifth largest earthquake in history and tsunami that devoured everything in its path. now hundreds of thousands of survivors face nuclear exposure and health dangers that may not show for years. >> 11,000 micro-sievert is equivalent of the exposure you get a year if you live a normal life. if you stay in the place for one hour you may be exposed to 11,000. we have to watch this. >> radiation is leaking from two nuclear reactors along the pacific coast heavily damaged by the earthquake. on tuesday, another explosion shook the region, damaging a containment pool and exposing part or all of the nuclear fuel rods insid
the case for u.s. involvement. his speech comes as libyan rebels resume their offensive. they advanced 350 miles this past weekend and recaptured two key oil sounds. u.s. officials say militau.s. military actions are mostly over. >> i think we prevented the large-scale slaughter that was beginning to take place and has taken place in some places. >> on one hand they say it is humanitarian and on the other they say gaddafi must go. >> this weekend the defense secretary and the secretary of state will brief congress on the mission and its cost. president's speech is tonight at 7:30 on abc 7. >>> the crisis in japan at the nuclear power plant may be getting worse. officials say highly radioactive iodine is seeping from the facility and contaminated the water is being found farther from the plant now. the crews are pumping out hundreds of tons of radioactive water. the plant's operators are apologizing for overstating radiation levels inside the reactors. >>> 32 years ago today the u.s. suffered its worst nuclear crisis. that was at three mile island nuclear plant in pennsylvania. >> the disas
that was run by the u.s. will be commanded by nato, an obama diplomatic win. but many in congress warn president obama not to send u.s. ground troops to depose gadhafi, who is said to be in this car today. >> yes, we want him out. no, we don't want to do it at the enormous cost of military invasion. >> reporter: the president has to justify taking sides in what some see as a civil war. >> will america's commitment & end in days, not weeks, as the president promised? >> reporter: defense secretary gates admitted on "meet the press," libya is not vital. >> no, i don't think it's vital interests for the united states, but we clearly have interests there, and it's a part of the recently, which is a vital interest for the united states. >> reporter: a region in chaos, uprisings in egypt, syria, bahrain, jordan, might the president commit the u.s. military elsewhere. libya's already cost about $1 billion. with no clear end in sight. >>> tonight, some u.s. naviville vessels are reported to be pulling out of the mediterranean. tomorrow, u.s. allies meet about libya. the plan is to put pressure
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
is set to have broadband speeds 200 times faster than the u.s. average. go to our website for more questions and answers. thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week. and i will see you next week. >>> your child gets into college. now the hard part -- how do you pay for it? we'll help you track down the money this hour. >>> and in these tough times, you might need to update your resumÉ. we've got some do's and don't's in the 4:00 p.m. eastern hour. >>> and 5:00, thousands of women take on walmart in a sex discrimination suit. it could be the most important case the u.s. supreme court hears this term. you're in the cnn news room, i'm fredricka witfield. >>> on the international front, rebel forces in libya say they are controlling two more key towns in their advance to tripoli. this is smoke hanging over the city of ras laneuf that where an opposition spokesman tells cnn government troops have pulled out of ports. both places were claimed by pro gadhafi forces at the start of the civil war. the next major city is moammar gadhafi's home town. rebel forces anticipate
into their cause. that is half of their active force. the united states involved in a big way, as well. the u.s.a. ronald -- u.s.s. ronald reagan and 20 rescue missions were run and choppers from there. six were in operation, rescue operations. you name it. at the end, it all comes to down to the japanese people. again in small coastal town we watched you might see a boat behind me. there were boats, there were trucks, there were cars lining the streets upside-down swept by the tsunami which had hit here on friday. most of those were taken away by the end of the day, very determined people, indeed. >> gregg: earthquake in japan hitting very close to home. many japanese-americans trying to get in touch with their loved ones. one community on the west coast springing into action to help victims. casey stegall is live in little tokyo section of los angeles. >> reporter: a lot of people don't know this but 300,000 japanese-americans call the state of california home. that is the largest population in all of the united states. little tokyo, a neighborhood back here behind me in downtown los angeles,
reportedly near or on a bus carrying u.s. soldiers at the frankfurt airport. amy kellogg is following this breaking story live from london. amy. >> reporter: yes, we're trying to piece together the information. we're getting it at this point various press agencies on the ground, pretty much now the frankfurt police and the u.s. military, who are investigating this. two people dead, we understand, one, a u.s. soldier, when allegedly a 21-year-old shooter from kosovo opened fire on a bus, carrying u.s. soldiers, at the frankfurt airport. now, this just happened, so, again, we're just piecing together this information. we believe it's one soldier killed, and the driver of the bus, and then two people taken to the hospital. you know the airport base, the medical center, which is part of the u.s. military s. based very close to frankfurt and that is the biggest u.s. military hospital outside the united states. it's where soldiers coming from iraq and afghanistan are treated. again, we don't have information about the actual soldiers on that bus, where they were going, to or from, but we kn
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
. the operation comes just days after the u.s., europe and the arab world announced a plan. >> our air force will oppose any action by colonel qaddafi against civilians. >> reporter: the u.s. will help protect french and other airmissions. depending upon how libyans respond, the u.s. mi launch additional attacks. secretary of state hillary clinton says that the u.s. will break unique capabilities to bare. >> we will support an international coalition as it takes all necessary measures to enforce the terms of resolution 1973. >> president obama says that the u.s. and a coalition of other countries are prepared to act with urgency to end violence against civilians in libya. >> our resolve is strong and the terms are clear. we must protect the libyan civilians. >> reporter: the u.s. navy right now has three submarines in the mediterranean. in new york, rick fullbow, fox news. >>> president obama spoke from brazil which is why you just saw a picture of him at the beginning of the story. president obama says that he did not want to take this action. in fact, that's why the u.s. are only protectin
at that plant are considering asking the u.s. military and japanese military to use hel helicopters to spray water into the reactors. that seems a dangerous measure but as you can see this crisis is escalating jon. greg: what is being done as far as the relief efforts? >> reporter: well, there's a massive relief effort going on come nateed by the nuclear issue. we know there are a hundred thousand japanese troops involved and the u.s. military are also heavily involved in it. the carrier the reagan is off-shore with a fleet of three ships and there's many more coming particularly from okinawa the marine base. they are gearing up to help at this time. it's very difficult. the other problem we are facing now is temperatures are dropping heavily at night and that is really hindering any attempt to save these people, basically four days after the earthquake and tsunami, jon. greg: with no power or heat in a lot of peep that's got to be a terrible tribulation for the people trying to survive. david piper reporting live. jenna: david mentioned some of our response. the u.s. military moving warship
consider asking for outside help but would the u.s. answer the call? as american warships head to the region just what is the u.s. military willing to offer? >>> oil futures rise above $100 a barrel a day after the dow slumped 1.5%. we'll check where the market is headed before the opening bell today. >>> and flip-flop already? or just a communications mix-up. we'll get to the bottom of newt announcing for president thursday debacle. chuck has the back story. good morning. wednesday, march 2nd, 2011. i'm savannah guthrie. >> i'm chuck todd. amazing what making sure you have two sources do and can keep you out of trouble. we'll get more into that. all of that plus does michael huckabee think president obama grew up in kenya and will the beloved "the daily rundown" moth pad get a tablet today. let's get to the rundown. moammar gadhafi is vowing to fight to the last man as he ramps up efforts to hold onto his country in the face of a growing rebellion. pierce battles in the east and west. the libyan air force is bombing rebel territory sending forces to an oil base in the eastern
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
the opportunity to do that in a way that u.s. presidents usually do. president obama taking all sorts of criticism from the right for not cancelling his trade visit to latin america as a result of this military action in libya. the white house knew that criticism would come. their decision to go ahead with the trip and forego the chest-thumping commander in chief theater at the start of a military convention, that is a fascinating and blunt demonstration of how much this presidency is not like that of george w. bush. do you remember when george w. bush campaigned for president by saying he wanted america to have a humble foreign policy? candidates for president love to say stuff like that. >> i don't think it's a role of the united states to walk into a country and say we do it this way, so should you. >> the united states must be humble and proud of our values, but humble in figure out how to chart their course. >> candidates say stuff like that when they are running because americans like that idea. americans like to vote for the idea. we like that kind of talk and we expect it from candidates.
american ally, u.s. war ships arriving earlier today and with help and supplies and our doug mche willway new live from washingtons and what's the american help for relief on this. >> the aircraft carrier u.s.s. reagan and battle groups as well as other military personnel conducted well over 20 missions providing humanitarian arrive and orion aircraft over debris fields trying to judge, and also looking for survivors. >> a 60-year-old man out to sea clinging to the roof. and he went to his house and got some belongses and out to sea and his apparently his wife remains missing. they're providing civilian to humanitarian aid and two search and rescue teams from west fairfax, virginia, and others to the quake zone and much equipment must come by roadway and the roads of course have been heavily damaged, no he it willing when they will get there with equipment and they are among rescue teams sent from ten different countries and the american red cross, also accepting donations, go to foxnews.com for information how to donate to them. the red cross basically serving as a secondary roll to the
, about u.s. involvement in the north african country. >> ifill: then, marcia coyle walks us through today's supreme court arguments in a huge class action suit against wal-mart. >> woodruff: we update the nuclear crisis in japan, as the prime minister says his country is on "maximum alert." >> ifill: miles o'brien reports from the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, the chernobyl power plant, where, decades later, radiation levels are still higher than normal. >> 25 years after the accident here, scientists are still trying to piece together its full impact. in the wake of events in japan there's new focus on their work. >> woodruff: and ray suarez interviews housing analyst robert shiller about new evidence of falling home prices in cities across the nation. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> .and our communities. >> in angola chevron h
on innocents here in the u.s. when will the government learn? from new york, defending freedom every night of the week, so long america! >> gregg: tripoli under attack right now. i'm gregg jarrett. a new round of air strikes by the international coalition and we're getting reports that air-raid sirens and explosions are being heard across the libyan capital and on calm's hometown. let's go right to steve harrigan. steve, what can you tell us. >> reporter: in the last few minutes we heard eight loud incoming ex pleogsz to the east of the city of tripoli. clearly audible. one round of three strikes, another round of five. we're not seeing the anti-aircraft fire that usually goes up. a remarkable shift in the battlefield. we are seeing the rebels advance quickly. they have taken four towns previously retreated. brega and one other. it's really being coalition powered that has paved the way targeting gadhafi forces and personnel carriers so the rebels have been able to advance so far without much of a fight. the government officials here say gadhafi forces are making a strategic retreat but it
is in afghanistan making a surprise visit overnight. for the next two days he'll visit with u.s. troops in the south and east where the taliban insurgency is strongest. he'll also meet with the president of afghanistan. this is gates' 13th trip to the country. he was last there in december. u.s. troops are set to begin withdrawal in july. >>> the crisis in libya is intensifying with battles over territory. opposition forces are trying to take control over cities surrounding the capital of tripoli. forces loyal to long-time leader moammar gadhafi are fighting back with heavy rounds of artillery, air strikes and gunfire. meanwhile, tens of thousands of people are escaping the violence and setting up a refugee camp across the border in tunisia. >>> violence in the middle east is costing up the price of oil production. this morning the u.s. is considering tapping into emergency oil reserves in response to oil gas prices. the u.s. has 727 million barrels of oil stored underground along the gulf coast. oil prices rising above $106 a barrel today in asia. >>> while you slept gas prices spiked again in the
are about 75, 80 miles from that initial reactor. we are outside of the ring by a good amount. u.s. helicopters according to one new york times report detected particles as far as 50 miles in the air. was it inland out in the water? the breezes blowout to sea so we are thinking it's out that way. that is a significant development. right now if you take all of the reports about what is going on the japanese will tell you anywhere between 200 and 300 thousand people have been evacuated from near those two different sites. again there are 120 kilometers apart. the first one is 75-80 miles up the coast from where i am standing now. those are up to 200, 300 thousand people have been evacuated 200 people have been treated for nuclear exposure from japanese sources from the government. those numbers are getting pretty solid since this morning when we got here i have been monitoring all of the feeds coming in as we can. it's a serious situation something everybody is watching extremely closely. you have already dealt with an earthquake here a tsunami significant after shocks and now this.
of terrorism after the u.s. drops 40 missiles and tomahawk cruise missiles targets sites. >> steve: joining us from the site where that plane was shot down yesterday, rick, do we know, whose plane was that and who did shoot it down? >> reporter: we can confirm now who that plane belonged to. we believe we're the only network have located the fighter jet that shot down out of the skies of benghazi, yesterday morning. behind me is the engine of that jet, the wings, char pieces remains and the photographer was rolling on the jet that was hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into that area on the southern edge of the city and what we're hearing from locals is that they believe the pilot, who was an opposition fighter as opposed to gaddafi directed this wounded jet into this area that's unpopulated and old adoption home. and the pilot put the jet here and we know that the pilot had a family and ejected far too late and we found the harness from his ejecting seat out of the seat itself and to clear up confusion we found a tail section of the jet pointed with the old royal jet and the new flag for t
afghanistan. but first, remarks on u.s. nuclear plan safety. >> i am asking specifically if an earthquake hit the power plan and georgia, based on your agency's review of their safety design, would it withstand that earthquake? >> all of the plants we are currently reviewing, will meet strict safety standards for earthquakes. for existing plants, we believe they can withstand an earthquake. in the new plants, we have not completed our review. i do not want to prejudge the outcome of that. >> but you are allowing this plan and georgia to be contstructed. >> it is a preliminary approval. that is not related to safety significance services at this time. >> in general, for each plan and the united states, regardless of where it is located, doesn't have a minimum safety requirement to withstand an earthquake? >> that is true. all the plants have a requirement to be designed to deal with the kinds of earthquakes we would expect in a 200 miles radius. >> if a plant is in an area more prone to earthquakes, it might have a higher requirement than one in an area that has not had an
at several u.s. military bases on japanese soil. one more image i want to get to you. here is the earthquake striking again. pictures inside a japanese newsroom. i mean, imagine. total panic there. the biggest damage, begiagain, caused by the massive tsunami. at last count, the official, i want to emphasize official, the official death toll was 151. authorities in japan say it could climb to over 1,000. john? >>> brooke, cnn's kyong lah is based in tokyo, she was on the subway when the earthquake hit. she filed a report now. she made her way to the most devastated part of the country. >> reporter: i'm in the back of our news van. we're trying to get to the northern area, the area that's been hard hit by the tsunami. but what we're finding is that it's very difficult to get up there because of the problems with tokyo still down, paralyzed with the problems we've seen from this afternoon's earthquake. more than 12 hours after the earthquake, you can see we're beginning to move a little bit, but there is still massive gridlock in the city. the highway shut down. the roadways, they're all backed
residents not to worry about radiation plume expected to reach the u.s. later today. >>> also this morning another major story unfolding. the u.n. backed libya's rebels approving a no-fly zone and clearing the path for military action against moammar gadhafi as early as today. we'll bring you the very latest from both libya and japan, "early" this friday morning, march 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good friday morning to you, i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. good morning to you. following two major stories on the "early" show this morning. >> of course we're looking at japan. but libya, as we mentioned briefly, the u.n. security council voting to approve that no-fly zone. as you can imagine, there are some strong reaction from moammar gadhafi. he's seen in the video there. many saying this really does pave the way for a military action. what could that mean? what could it look like? we'll get you the very latest on that coming up here. >> exactly. but first let's begin with the very latest on the disaster in japan. the danger level is being raised in
libian forces. >> rebels trying to advance on several cities but they are not organized and the u.s. is warning of a long stalemate. also following breaking developments concerning a u.s. war plane that crashed in a field near benghazi. the pilot of the f-15 e eagle was rescued and is okay. >> as doug luzader reports, the white house is trying to dial back the u.s. involvement in the mission. >> reporter: the u.s. plans to step back now from the primary leadership role in this libian operation just as the international consensus may be fraying. a reinvigorated opposition in eastern libya and a path of destruction on a high way of what remains of a gadhafi forces that was closing in on a rebel strong hold. the pounding on u.s. and coalition forces has begun to subside. the impetuous is on looking down the air space over the libian capital. >> with the growing capabilities of the coalition, i anticipate the no-fly zone will extend to dregga and disratta and tripoli. >> reporter: but some are questioning how this will play out. the bomb and missile attacks have gone beyond taking out a
're being honest. i think the u.s. government, because we've got folks there, also knows what's going on and need to level with us too. >> how much longer can or should the situation go on before engineers at this plant possibly give up the battle? >> i think we can't afford to give up the battle. that's the problem here. this is the cost of nuclear power. we've got to keep trying to bring this under control, because what's already a catastrophe could get even worse now. >> a new report released today, damon, shows one of the reactors may be releasing mox fuel. explain mox fuel, and does that make the situation more dire? >> it absolutely does. what's happened last august or september the japanese began a controversial experiment of using a mixed plutonium fuel in this reactor, unit number three, where we've had one of the explosions, and this is making it more dangerous to operate the reactor. if there were radioactive releases from the reactor, which we believe there are, it could make those releases far more dangerous. and it should be noted that this program of using that mox fuel
the objective and u.s. involvement in the conflict. he did defend his decision to engage u.s. military forces in that conflict. in his weekly radio address today, he touted the successes of u.s. and coalition forces saying they have both helped to knock down moammar gadhafi's air defense mechanisms as well as push back his ground forces. the president said that he had to engage in this conflict to do to save lives. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a blood bath that could destabilize an entire region, and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> reporter: but the president is facing mounting criticisms from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who say there is a lack of congressional involvement in setting up u.s. policy in libya. and the president held a conference call with congressional leaders yesterday, trying to add
. >> we begin with the crisis in libya. the u.s. military is joining other nations with air attacks. we have video cued up showing tomahawk missiles being fired. the air assault is being called operation odyssey dawn. thanks for joining us at 10:00, i'm will thomas. >> and i'm maurine. france are main players in the operation using sea and air fleets to attack. steve is in tripoli with the latest. >> reporter: this is one of the first tomahawk missiles launched from a u.s. navy destroyer in the mediterranean. more than 100 fires, their target is libya's air defense systems. a senior u.s. official says the strikes severely disabled them, clearing the way for air patrols by french fighter jets to cripple libya's air power. moammar gadhafi vowing revenge, staying arms are being opened to let people defend the country and threatening to attack military and civilian targets in the mediterranean region. the mediterranean and north africa will become a real war zone because of this irresponsible act and all countries interest in the reason will be in danger starting from now because of this m
. of course, it's been french, british, u.s. fighter jets that have been launching most of the air strikes. again, today another set of air strikes, according to a french official, in or near tripoli targeting a command center, brooke. >> reza, here is a new town, we're all learning, gadhafi's birthplace. we know the rebels are moving westward toward sirte. is that the next big battle, symbolic battle as well, for rebels here? >> reporter: well, it looks like it's the first battle in about three days. the opposition forces over the past 72 hours have been making it look relatively easy, rolling toward the west. this is the first time they're seeing resistance, little bit of fighting. that's probably because sirte is the hometown, the birthplace of colonel gadhafi. he has a lot of supporters, not clear how many have remained in this location. his tribe is based out of this place. rebel fighters telling cnn they're seeing some resistance, telling us that gadhafi loyalists using sha containry, trickery. one rebel fighter telling us that it looks like civilians have been armed. opposition figh
in tripoli. a u.s. official tells cnn the protesters are well armed and could carry on the fight for some time. that means tanks and antiaircraft guns. >> what war? what war? then we will die. >> everybody using guns before the people. anybody makes a small move, they kill them. >> the heavy fighting caused them to flee for the border. it's causing a humanitarian crisis. many are in tent cities in the tunisian border. police arrived yesterday to try to help the situation. let's get back to tripoli. it's the stronghold and the scene for the fiercest battles we have seen. cnn international correspondent knick robertson joins me. good morning to you. you spoke with gadhafi's son late last night. does he think his father still has control of the country? >> reporter: he thinks his father has control and is going to hold on. the objective is for the army to take complete control before they get into any political reforms and steps to meet the demands of the armed opposition. what's happening 40 miles from here he said is hugely important. it's important because it's going to stronghold rebels
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
. 2011] >> the u.s. house meets today at 2:00 eastern for general speeches. legislative work starts at 4:00. members will consider bills designating dentists and vetenarian as emergency responders and disasters. tomorrow the congress will hear from the australian prime minister in a joint meeting. we'll have a live coverage of that at 11:00 eastern. on wednesday members begin kuwait on eliminating mortgage relief. transportation secretary ray lahood is on capitol hill this afternoon. he's testifying before the senate transportation committee. about his department's 2012 budget request. c-span3 will have live coverage beginning at 2:30 eastern. >> the new way to get a concise review of the day's events it's "washington today" on c-span radio. every week day we'll take you to capitol hill, the white house, and anywhere news is happening. we'll also talk with the experts, the politician mrs., and -- politicians, and the journalists. the stories that matter to you the most every week day on c-span radio. can you listen in the washington-baltimore area at 90.1 f.m. and nationwide on xm slight
will convene the latest hearing on islamic radicalization in the u.s. six witnesses will testify at this hearing that will be live on c-span3. three members of congress will be testifying, including one of two muslims in the congress, dingell, and frank wolf, a republican from virginia. what is your reaction to this hearing? we want to discuss it this morning on the "washington journal." as we go through the newspapers. host: we have set aside our fourth line this morning on the "washington journal" for muslims in the u.s. we will begin taking those phone calls in just a moment. first, we want to get an update on what is going on in the congress when it comes to money. here is the headline in yesterday's "washington times." "senators hail defeat of rival spending cuts." joining us on the line is david hawkins. what happened yesterday in the senate and what happens next? guest: yesterday in the senate, the senate was asked to vote on two competing versions of legislation to cut money for the rest of this fiscal year, which only last until september 30. the republican option, the b
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
for live coverage of the u.s. house. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. march 14, 2011. i hereby appoint the honorable john campbell to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 5, 2011, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour, and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each. but in no event shall debate continue beyond 1:50 p.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from south carolina, mr. duncan, for one minute. mr. duncan: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. duncan: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to speak on behalf of
force against yet another middle eastern country, this time it is oil rich libya. u.s. naval and air forces attacked libyan military installations across that country, wiping out air defenses, intelligence systems, tanks, and also apparently is now targeting that nation's ground forces. under what policy is the executive branch operating without a vote of congress and expending millions of defense dollars and state dollars on offensive action taken inside a nation that did nothing provocative toward the united states and in fact last year was even a recipient of u.s. foreign aid? the president's justification for this action was that it was not an act of war but rather humanitarian mission to prevent a catastrophe that would have result interested libya's military forces under the command of libyan president gaddafi from taking the civilian center. our president says he did not act alone. as french, british, canadian, and other western nato members participated in these attacks. the president informed congress that future operations will be handled by nato. who exactly decided all of
in the air and wounded 11 workers. meanwhile, u.s. resources are arrived to help the country responded to friday's earthquake that killed more than 10,000. japan's prime minister says it was the worst crisis since world war ii. while japan works to control its nuclear facilities from a third explosion, here and the united states, some lawmakers are asking for a halt to our nuclear power facilities. your thoughts on the that this morning. we will begin with "the new york times" and their head line. "u.s. nuclear push may be in peril." also this morning, it notes and "the washington post" -- a wary look at u.s. nuclear plants. regulators are reviewing license applications for 20 reactors -- yesterday on the sunday show, senator joseph lieberman, independent, talked about whether or not to have a temporary halt on nuclear power. here is what he had to say. >> we have 104 nuclear power plants in our country. every year, once a year, fema, nuclear regulatory commission, they go through emergency planning to see what they would do if it's a disaster struck. -- if a disaster struck. the reali
a command center. of course, it's been french jets, british jets and u.s. jets that have launched most of the air strikes. >> reza, we were told from the beginning that allied air pour power is only really protecting civilians. is that meaningful at this point? >> well, at this point there's no question. it's facilitating the push by the opposition forces west towards tripoli, the final destination. look at march 19th. that was the date when this no-fly zone was put in place. that's when opposition forces started pushing west. on saturday the air strikes softened up the artillery units. then it was brega, ras lanuf. the first little bit of resistance. the air strikes are pivotal in the progress of the rebel forces. >> and nato is supposed to take control of the no-fly zone today and the whole operation by the end of the week. does this matter to the rebels? do they feel this is what's helping them? >> it will matter if the air strikes are deescalated. with nato taking control, there are some member states that are not as enthusiastic as others about the aggressive nar of the air strike
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